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This question has been up for almost 11 months already. Can we close questions that are too old and unanswered?
I also think that the question is too "open". It's asking us: "what is this metal frame called?" I have no answer; I've done research, I've looked for the company that they were talking about, but nothing; they don't give us clues, the name of the company, or something to start off. I think it needs a big edit from the author. Can we close this question?

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No. Just because there are no answers doesn't mean the question should be closed. Good questions stay up indefinitely; the only reasons questions get closed have to with their quality or topicality.

As for this particular question, I think it is very clear: it describes - in clear wording - the object, where it came from, the problem with it, and the details needed to answer it, and it has a clear photo. It's a textbook question in that sense.

But in those cases where you're unsure: you can flag questions, so the community can decide.

Also note that we are not a collection of users that know 'google-fu': that you cannot find the answer online (assuming that's what you mean by "I've done research", instead of going to the library or visiting local frame-makers :) doesn't mean a question is unanswerable. Most questions here assume that there are users around who have (extensive) experience with (certain aspects of) arts and crafts.

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  • I have a black belt on Google-fu😎
    – Isaac750
    May 13 at 5:31
  • 1
    @Isaac750 Please don't use that to quickly scour for answers. It's fine to search for an answer online, but please inform yourself properly about the subject: cross-examine multiple sources, make sure they're reputable, look for downsides, compare multiple solutions, find expert information and experiences of others (in reviews, or on dedicated forums). If you have a black belt, use it, extensively. Spend time doing research, collect information, structure and summarize that information, look at the question again and remove everything from your answer that has nothing to with the question.
    – Joachim Mod
    May 14 at 7:39

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